Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Keyboarding Versus Handwriting Speed and Learning Disabilities

Keyboarding versus Handwriting Speed and Learning DisabilitiesKeyboarding Versus Handwriting Speed and Learning Disabilities

Computers & Education published research investigating keyboarding versus handwriting speed and learning disabilities.  Many individuals handwrite faster than they can keyboard.  In order to close this gap, the researchers offered a touch-typing program which was completed by 17 neurotypical higher education students and 25 students with specific learning disabilities (i.e reading and/or writing disabilities).  The immediate and long-term effect of the touch-typing program indicated the following:

  • handwriting remained a faster writing mode than keyboarding.
  • although at the delayed post-test (approximately 3 months following the completion of the program), keyboarding became faster than handwriting only for the group of students with specific learning disabilities.

The researchers concluded that efficient and automatic keyboarding for writing is important for the general population and especially students with specific learning disabilities.

Read 5 Evidence-Based Factors that Effect Handwriting Speed.

Read results from the handwriting versus keyboarding survey.

Download FREE Keyboarding Words Per Minute Goal Tracker.

Read more on workstation positioning.

Read research on Manuscript, Cursive or Keyboarding.

Reference:  Weigelt-Marom, H., & Weintraub, N. (2018). Keyboarding versus handwriting speed of higher education students with and without learning disabilities: Does touch-typing assist in narrowing the gap?. Computers & Education117, 132-140.

If you need to collect data on keyboarding skills check out Keyboarding Rubrics.

This is an electronic book of 28 rubrics to assess keyboarding skills.  A rubric is a scoring guide to judge performance on a specific task. Have you ever wanted to quantify general keyboarding skills, operating the mouse, word processing or keyboarding skills by grade level?   Keyboarding Rubrics can be used as an assessment tool to quantify an individual’s written productivity.  By using the rubric, each individual can be scored based on the same criteria.

Keyboarding Rubrics Table of Contents:
GENERAL INFORMATION ON RUBRICS
SUGGESTED USES AND HOW TO SCORE THE RUBRICS
WORK STATION AREA CHECKLIST
KEYBOARDING AND THE COMMON CORE GRADES 3-12
HANDWRITING AND KEYBOARDING FLUENCY REFERENCE CHART
PROPER POSITIONING FOR KEYBOARDING
BEGINNER SKILLS FOR KEYBOARDING
BASIC SKILLS FOR KEYBOARDING
OVERALL KEYBOARDING
OPERATING THE MOUSE
WORD PROCESSING
PRE-KINDERGARTEN: KEYBOARDING
KINDERGARTEN: KEYBOARDING
TYPING NAME
FIRST GRADE: KEYBOARDING
SECOND GRADE: KEYBOARDING
THIRD GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
THIRD GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
FOURTH GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
FOURTH GRADE: WRITING APPLICATION
FOURTH GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
FIFTH GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
FIFTH GRADE: WRITING APPLICATION
FIFTH GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
SIXTH GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
SIXTH GRADE: WRITING APPLICATION
SIXTH GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
SEVENTH GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
SEVENTH GRADE: WRITING APPLICATION
SEVENTH GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
EIGHTH GRADE: FORM, PRODUCTION AND FLUENCY
EIGHTH GRADE: WRITING APPLICATION
EIGHTH GRADE: WORD PROCESSING
The rubrics will be delivered electronically in PDF format and in Word format so that you can edit the document if necessary. This allows you to customize the rubric to your individual caseload if necessary. If you do not have Microsoft Word you can download Open Office (www.openoffice.org) for free which is compatible with all most Office suites.
Some suggested uses of Keyboarding Rubrics are:
  • assessment at initial evaluation and annual reviews
  • pre and post therapy session
  • progress reports
  • establish entrance or exit criteria for therapy
  • creating measurable goals

FIND OUT MORE

The post Keyboarding Versus Handwriting Speed and Learning Disabilities appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Monday, December 11, 2017

Task-Oriented Training for Children with Hemiplegia

Task Oriented Training for Children with Hemiplegia

Task-Oriented Training for Children with Hemiplegia

The Journal of Physical Therapy published research on task-oriented training for children with hemiplegia.  The researchers investigated the effects of task-oriented training (TOT) on hand dexterity and strength in 12 children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.  Six children were assigned to the experimental group who received the task-oriented training for 20 minutes of a 60-minute conventional occupational therapy session.  The other six children served as the control group and received 60 minutes of conventional occupational therapy.

The task-oriented training sessions consisted of activities such as repeated reaching, ring activity, and stacking cup to catch the target using the involved hand with therapist feedback provided.  Following 4 weeks of 2 sessions per week, the following results were seen from dynamometer testing and the Box and Block Test (number of blocks moved from one box to another in one minute):

  • the task-oriented group showed a significant improvement in hand dexterity but not in strength
  • the control group did not show a significant improvement in hand dexterity or strength

The researchers recommend further research with a larger sample size and to determine any long-term effects.

Reference:  Moon, J. H., Jung, J. H., Hahm, S. C., & Cho, H. Y. (2017). The effects of task-oriented training on hand dexterity and strength in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a preliminary study. Journal of physical therapy science29(10), 1800-1802.

Therapeutic Play Activities for Children DownloadTherapeutic Play Activities for Children– Do you work with young children with cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorders, developmental disabilities or delays? Are you in search of new, creative ideas for your therapy sessions? Do you need home exercise program sheets to encourage carryover of therapeutic activities? Do you need simple ideas that use materials that you have around your house, therapy room or classroom already? Do you work with children who receive constraint or bimanual therapy? Therapeutic Play Activities for Children includes 100 play activity sheets with a photo of the activity, purpose of each activity and materials list. The 12 tip sheets include topics such as modifications, peer interaction, guided play, prompts and several specifically for children with cerebral palsy. FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION.

The post Task-Oriented Training for Children with Hemiplegia appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Postural Stability and Dyslexia

Postural Stability and DyslexiaPostural Stability and Dyslexia

Gait and Posture published research on postural stability and dyslexia.  The participants included 24 children with dyslexia and 24 children without dyslexia who were evaluated to determine the influence of foot soles and visual information on postural control.  To evaluate postural stability, the surface area, the length and mean velocity of the center of pressure and the Romberg Quotient (a percentage of the measured instability during eyes closed to that during eyes open) was measured in two postural conditions (with and without a 4 mm foam under feet) and in two visual conditions (eyes open or closed).

The results indicated the following:

  • the surface area, length and mean velocity of the center of pressure were significantly greater in the dyslexic children compared to the non-dyslexic children, particularly with foam and eyes closed.
  • the Romberg Quotient was significantly smaller in the dyslexic children and significantly greater without foam than with foam.

The researchers concluded that children with dyslexia are not able to compensate with other available inputs when sensory inputs are less informative (with foam, or eyes closed), which results in poor postural stability.  In addition, the researchers suggested that the impairment of the cerebellar integration of all the sensory inputs is responsible for the postural deficits observed in children with dyslexia.

 

The lead author of the study, Nathalie Goulème, Ph.D., recommends:

  • exercises on a balance platform challenging children to maintain their stability in different conditions i.e. eyes closed, unstable or visual stimulation in order to improve postural control and utilize efficient sensory strategies.
  • children to participate in sports, games and leisure activities that require eye-hand coordination and balance skills.

When children have difficulties maintaining postural control it involves more energy, therefore during higher cognitive load tasks such as reading attention is shared possibly decreasing learning capabilities.

Reference:

Bell, Katie. (2017) Dyslexia affects ability to adjust to impaired sensory feedback.  LER Pediatrics.  Retrieved from the web on 12/7/17 at http://ift.tt/2izq84G

Goulème, N., Villeneuve, P., Gérard, C. L., & Bucci, M. P. (2017). Influence of both cutaneous input from the foot soles and visual information on the control of postural stability in dyslexic children. Gait & Posture56, 141-146.

If you need more core strengthening activities for children check out:

The Core Strengthening Handbook

The Core Strengthening Handbook:  This download includes 50+ activities including:

  • Quick and Easy Core Strengthening Activities for Kids
  • Core Strengthening Exercises With Equipment
  • Core Strengthening Play Ideas

The Core Strengthening Exercise Program: This digital download includes exercises to help make core strengthening fun and entertaining for kids while promoting carryover in the classroom and at home!  FIND OUT MORE.

Postural Stability and Dyslexia

 

The post Postural Stability and Dyslexia appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Unwrapped – Free Holiday Visual Spatial Puzzle

Unwrapped - Free Holiday Visual Spatial PuzzleUnwrapped – Free Holiday Visual Spatial Puzzle

This FREE holiday visual spatial puzzle is a fun challenge to complete on any holiday.  Many of you work in school districts where there can be no mention of a specific holiday.  This printable is secular – gifts and presents.  Maybe you celebrate Christmas, maybe Hannukah, maybe it is a birthday party, whatever the holiday can you guess what is inside each gift when it is unwrapped?

Children will have to use their visual skills to estimate the size and shape of the gift and which toy fits inside.  Draw a line from the gift to the correct toy.  It is in black and white for economical printing and cute illustrations suitable for all ages.

If you need more difficult visual-spatial activities, check out Visual Spatial Mazes.  Need more seasonal visual perceptual activities?  Check out all of these titles for throughout the year.

To download your FREE holiday visual-spatial puzzle, sign up to receive our newsletter.  If you already receive it, just enter your email and you will be redirected to the download.

Unwrapped - Free Holiday Visual Spatial Puzzle

The post Unwrapped – Free Holiday Visual Spatial Puzzle appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Selfie Elf Challenge – Get Kids Moving

Selfie Elf ChallengeSelfie Elf Challenge – Get Kids Moving

Are you up for a challenge to get the kids moving?  Download this FREE Selfie Elf Challenge at the end of the post.  See if the children can match the elf poses EXACTLY with their bodies and snap a photo.  Show the picture to the child and see if they notice any differences between their pose and the elf’s pose.

For example, ask the child if they are holding up the correct hand (right or left), do the facial expressions match and do the legs match (right and left)?  Repeat for each elf pose.

This would be a great partner activity – one child snaps the photo and checks for an exact match.  Then switch.

Want to do it as a group?  Snap photos of them all doing the same pose.

Don’t want to use a photo?  Just mimic the elf actions on the page.

Want to make this activity more difficult?  Call out a number and the child have to match that elf.  Call out 2 numbers in a row and the children have to match those two poses.  Call out 3 numbers in a row, the children have to remember the number sequence and match the poses in the correct order.  Continue all the way up to calling out 6 numbers.

Need more Holiday Activities?  Check out the December Bundle!

December Bundle Fine Motor Gross Motor Visual Perceptual Activities from Your Therapy Source

Sign up to receive our email newsletter to gain access to your FREE Selfie Elf Challenge.  If you already subscribe, just enter your email and you will be redirected to the download in a new tab.

Selfie Elf Challenge from Your Therapy Source

The post Selfie Elf Challenge – Get Kids Moving appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Monday, December 4, 2017

Orthographic Processing and Handwriting

Orthographic Processing and HandwritingOrthographic Processing and Handwriting

Handwriting evaluations usually include legibility, speed, spacing and pencil grip but do you consider orthographic processing?  Orthographic processing is the ability to understand and recognize writing components such as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.  Students with weak orthographic processing rely very heavily on sounding out common words that should be in memory, which can result in deficiencies in decoding skills and written expression.  In addition, there can be difficulties with letter recognition and letter reversals. If a student does not have the visual memory skills to recognize the shape and orientation of a letter, they are more likely to make reversal errors.

Cognitive Neuropsychology published research on how deficits in orthographic processing affect movement production during word writing.  The participants included children with dyslexia and dysgraphia.  To assess the impact of spelling process disorders on handwriting, participants had to write on digital tablets different categories of words: regular and irregular, common and rare, sensical (ex: futur) and pseudo, non-sensical words (ex: furut).

The results indicated the following:

  • writing irregular words and pseudo-words increased movement duration and dysfluency indicating that the spelling processes were active while the children were writing the words.
  • the impact of these spelling processes was stronger for the children with dyslexia and dysgraphia.
  • most dyslexic/dysgraphic children presented similar writing patterns.
  • the act of writing irregular and pseudowords had a particularly noticeable impact on the hand movements of dyslexic children.  When the spelling was so difficult it impaired some children’s efforts to write resulting in irregular, and sometimes, unreadable shapes.

The researchers concluded that the interaction between orthographic and motor processing add up to a significant cognitive load that may affect the handwriting of the children with dyslexia/dysgraphia.

References:

ACT Government and Training. Learning Difficulties Factsheet 7: What is orthographic processing? Retrieved from the web on 12/4/17 at http://ift.tt/2AJ1ysO

CNRS. (2017, November 28). Dyslexia: When spelling problems impair writing acquisition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 4, 2017 from http://ift.tt/2iKZ99U

Kandel, S., Lassus-Sangosse, D., Grosjacques, G., & Perret, C. (2017). The impact of developmental dyslexia and dysgraphia on movement production during word writing. Cognitive Neuropsychology34(3-4), 219-251.

Handwriting Stations

Handwriting Stations includes the materials to create a handwriting station on a tri-fold or in a folder. The station includes proper letter formation for capital and lower case letters, correct posture, pencil grip, warm up exercises, letter reversals tips and self check sheet. In addition, there are 27 worksheets for the alphabet and number practice (Handwriting without Tears® style and Zaner-Bloser® style). This download is great for classroom use, therapy sessions or to send home with a student.  Find out more information.

Orthographic Processing and Handwriting

The post Orthographic Processing and Handwriting appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Saturday, December 2, 2017

December 2017 Edition – Digital Magazine for Pediatric OTs and PTs

December 2017 Digital Magazine for OTs and PTs from YourTherapySourceDigital Magazine for Pediatric OTs and PTs – December 2017 Edition

After a short hiatus, the Your Therapy Source digital magazine is back up and running.  The magazine is a great way to catch up on recent research, activity ideas and freebies from the previous month all in one location.  View this month’s edition below.

Table of Contents
Your Therapy Source Digital Magazine December 2017

HOW TO GET STUDENTS READY TO LEARN AFTER BRAIN BREAKS OR RECESS
MOTOR PLANNING AND CEREBRAL PALSY
LINK BETWEEN READING, VISUAL PERCEPTION, AND VISUAL–MOTOR INTEGRATION
ONE SIMPLE WAY TO IMPROVE PARTICIPATION
TEACHING THROWING AND CATCHING TO CHILDREN WITH DCD
FINE MOTOR SKILLS LINKED TO NUMERICAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT
MOTOR OVERFLOW IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
EFFECTS OF YOGA ON AUTISM SYMPTOMS
HOW TO WRITE A SOCIAL STORY WITH VISUAL SUPPORTS
FINE MOTOR SKILLS, VISUAL FUNCTION, AND READING IN CHILDREN
LESS AFFECTED HAND IN UNILATERAL CEREBRAL PALSY
GROSS MOTOR SKILLS, POSTURAL STABILITY, AND AUTISM
YOUNG PEOPLE’S ATTITUDES ABOUT STANDING FRAMES
COLOR CUT GLUE FOR DECEMBER – SCISSOR SKILLS PRACTICE
ELEPHANT HOLIDAY HAT – SCISSOR AND FINE MOTOR ACTIVITY
DIRECTIONALITY WORKSHEET – WHICH WAY IS THE ANIMAL FACING?  

 

Sign up to receive our email newsletter to access the magazine.  If you already receive our emails, just enter your email address again and you will have access to the magazine.  A new tab will open with the FREE PDF version of the magazine.  To stay updated daily follow the blog.

The post December 2017 Edition – Digital Magazine for Pediatric OTs and PTs appeared first on Your Therapy Source.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...